Why You Need Wood Effect…

So it’s coming up to the Christmas period, and you’re starting to think about decorating your home, in time for your festive guests. After all, you don’t want them to be faced with the same boring decor as the last few years, do you? You want to give them something new to look at. Something nice; something stylish; something interesting. Not just for them, though. For you, too. You deserve an inviting new look in your home, to carry you through the festive period, and into the year ahead.

Right now, you’re probably looking for interior design and decorating ideas. When it comes to transforming a room, the floor is a great place to start. When a person steps into a room, they’re looking at their feet, to check they’re not going to trip over a loose cable or a sleeping pet – so the first thing they see is the floor. The floor carries the room, and ties all the furnishings together – from the sofa, to the coffee table, to the TV stand, to the bookcases, over in the corner. It’s important that you get the floor just right. When rejuvenating a floor space, wood effect tiles should be the first thing on your tick list. Here are some reasons why.

antique-wood-effect-tiles

Wood effect versus natural wood

These days, with high definition printing, wood effect tiles look just as good as the real thing – a natural wooden floor. They have a textured surface; alive with knots and grooves, much like real wood, and they vary from tile to tile, with several different designs; giving them the variety that natural wood offers. So, when you’re talking realism, wood effect tiles come up trumps. But there are other reasons why wood effect is better than the real thing.

Firstly, to get the floorboards in your kitchen, living room, dining area, bathroom or bedroom looking good, it would take a strenuous amount of sanding, treating and waxing. Reclaiming a wooden floor is tricky business, resulting in countless splinters and swearwords. You might not even have floorboards to begin with. You might have concrete or, if your house is newer, plain old MDF – which is something no occupant or guest should have to look at. So wood effect tiles are a good option. Forget about what’s underneath, and start again; piecing together something fresh and aesthetically pleasing.

Secondly, the surfaces of wood effect tiles are more robust than the skin of natural wood. Floorboards mark and scratch like nobody’s businesses, no matter how much we wax and seal them. One chair scraped across them, and it’s goodnight Vienna; all of your sanding and hardwork has counted for nothing, and you’ll have to cover it over with a rug. Wood Effect Tiles don’t scratch anywhere near as easily; giving you complete peace of mind.

Wood effect tiles, laminate flooring or carpet?

In the short term, laminate flooring can seem quite appealing. It clicks together easy enough. But it’s not long before the floor space you’ve clicked together starts to come apart. For one thing, laminate swells in the heat; meaning you have large sections that are raised up off the ground, and they drop down suddenly when you walk across them. And heaven forbid you spill any fluid a laminate floor. The liquid seeps into the cracks, and the hideous MDF cocktail inside puffs up; giving you scarred, swollen edging around the sides of the planks. Again, laminate scratches like nobody’s business. Wood effect tiles don’t swell, and they’re resistant to water, if you use waterproof adhesive and grout!

Don’t get us started on carpet. One drunk guest clumsily knocking over a glass of red white, and it’s game over. Not to mention mischievous toddlers crawling along with a felt tip pen in each hand, or a muddy-pawed dog. You can scrub as much as you like, but some stains just aren’t coming out, and you’re left with a carpet that looks more like a Monet. Spill a glass of rosé on a wood effect tile, and one wipe of the cloth will see you right. That’s all we’re saying.

Endless style possibilities

Choice. This is where you’re really limited when it comes to reclaiming floorboards, laying laminate or fitting carpet. ‘Yes, sir. Will that be light wax or dark wax? Brown laminate or slightly browner laminate? Thick carpet or thin carpet?’ Where’s the choice? Where’s the creativity? With tiles, there’s no limitation to what we can make. We’re not restricted to rectangular, plank-shaped pieces. We can produce larger tiles with more intricate designs. We can create the illusion of elaborately carved artwork; lovingly slotted together. Here are some fantastic examples:

vintage-wood-parquet-tiles

parquet-vintage-wood-tiles

Part of our exclusive Louisa Charlotte Collection, these Rovere Vintage Wood Effect Tiles have a striking parquet effect; perfect for bringing period charm to a floor space. It would cost you thousands in carpentry bills to produce this from real wood.

vintage-wood-tiles

bianco-wood-floor-tiles

From the same range, these Bianco Vintage Floor Tiles have a crate effect design; with a frame surrounding four tightly-packed slats. They’re perfect for brightening up a bathroom, kitchen or living area.

estrellar-statement-floor-t

estrellar-wood-effect-tile

With inter-locking circles and staggered star patterns, these Estrellar Wood Effect Tiles will bring any floor space to life. The captivating musing of light and dark wood is ideal for creating a statement floor in your home.

So will you be introducing wood effect into your home this season? Let us know over on Facebooktwitter or Google+.

 


 

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